US terror list an instrument used by government: American author

The U.S. list of Terrorist organizations has little or nothing to do with who are and are not actually Terrorists; “it is, instead, simply an instrument” used by the U.S. government, says a prominent American author, journalist, and political commentator.

According to a report published by Habilian database, Glenn Greenwald wrote that supporters of MEK have filed a lawsuit asking a federal court to force the State Department to decide within 30 days whether to remove MEK from the list of designated Terrorist organizations.

He then made reference to Hillary Clinton’s response to the Court and said, “In response, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has told the court that (1) it has no role to play in directing the timing of this decision and (2) the U.S. Government is currently attempting to force MEK to move from its current base in Camp Ashraf to another location in Iraq (something MEK does not want to do), and whether MEK cooperates with the U.S. Government’s directives will play a large role in determining whether the group is removed from the Terrorist list.”

“With regard to that second argument: in determining whether MEK belongs on the Terrorist list, what conceivable difference should it make whether MEK is cooperative in moving from Camp Ashraf as the U.S. Government wants? What does their cooperation or lack thereof have to do with whether they are a Terrorist organization?”

“The answer, of course, is that the U.S. list of Terrorist organizations (like its list of state sponsors of Terrorism) has little or nothing to do with who are and are not actually Terrorists; it is, instead, simply an instrument used to reward those who comply with U.S. dictates (you’re no longer a Terrorist) and to punish those who refuse (you are hereby deemed Terrorists),” he concludes.

Mujahedin-e Khalq was placed on the U.S. State Department list of Foreign Terrorist Organizations from its inception in 1997, for killing American civilians in the 1970s.


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